• Westward Motel & Gift Shop, ca. 1965

    Westward Motel & Gift Shop, ca. 1965

    Street view of the Westward Motel and Gift Shop located on Aurora Avenue in Shoreline. Owned and operated by Bill and Mildred Rother.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00813

    Date: 1965?

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  • Hotel Lincoln, ca. 1910

    Hotel Lincoln, ca. 1910

    Located at 4th Avenue and Madison Street, Washington, Hotel Lincoln was constructed in 1900. The hotel was destroyed in a fire in 1920.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00805

    Date: 1910?

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  • Exterior to African Exhibit Pavilion

    Exterior to African Exhibit Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Africa Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "The nations of Africa, the majority of which have achieved independence since the end of World War II, are introduced and explained in the African Nations Pavilion on the International Mall. The exhibit shows how experts expect the African continent to develop in the next four decades. It explains the differences between the African peoples and the size and shape of the many new nations on the world’s second largest continent. Included in the displays, which were arranged in cooperation with several universities and associations, are African artifacts and handicrafts." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 84.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00019

    Date: 1962-04-18

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  • King Street Station, ca. 1906

    King Street Station, ca. 1906

    During the early 1900s, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was constructed in 1911. Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot. The postcard captioning can be confusing because both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01017

    Date: 1906?

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  • A Summer Home at Alki Point Washington, 1906

    A Summer Home at Alki Point Washington, 1906

    View of West Seattle residence at Alki Point with people posed on the front porch.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00602

    Date: 1906

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  • Hotel Butler, ca. 1905

    Hotel Butler, ca. 1905

    The original Butler Block building was a three story wooden structure that was constructed around 1875. This building burned in the fire of 1889 but was quickly replaced with a more substantial stone structure. The Butler Hotel or Hotel Butler began operation in the building in 1903, attracting many visitors and gaining a reputation during Prohibition for ignoring the laws against alcohol. The Great Depression forced the hotel to close its doors in 1933 and now all that remains are the lower two floors of the building which were converted into a parking garage.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00815

    Date: 1905?

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  • Residences on Capitol Hill, ca. 1905

    Residences on Capitol Hill, ca. 1905

    Street view of residences on Capitol Hill.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00606

    Date: 1905?

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  • King Street Station, ca. 1906

    King Street Station, ca. 1906

    During the early 1900's, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was constructed in 1911. (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) The postcard captioning can be confusing because both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01014

    Date: 1906?

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  • Seattle Railway Depots and Southern Business District, Seattle, Washington, April 15, 1940

    Seattle Railway Depots and Southern Business District, Seattle, Washington, April 15, 1940

    Laidlaw, Charles R., 1899-1974

    View looking north of Seattle Railway Depots and downtown Seattle. King Street Station (with the tower) appears on the left and Union Station appears on the right. Smith Tower can be seen in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01000

    Date: 1940-04-15

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  • St. James Cathedral, ca. 1910

    St. James Cathedral, ca. 1910

    Bishop Edward O'Dea purchased the land for St. James Cathedral's First Hill site in 1903 after successfully petitioning the Pope to relocate the episcopal see from Vancouver, Washington to Seattle. The cornerstone for the building was laid in 1905 with more than 5,000 people in attendance and the cathedral officially opened on December 15, 1907.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00312

    Date: 1910?

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