• A Vista from Pergola of Hotel Lincoln, Seattle, Wash., ca. 1909

    A Vista from Pergola of Hotel Lincoln, Seattle, Wash., ca. 1909

    Hotel Lincoln was constructed in 1900 at the intersection of 4th Avenue and Madison Street. The hotel was destroyed by fire in 1920.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00819

    Date: 1909?

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  • Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, 1903

    Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, 1903

    Located in Pioneer Square at the intersection of Yesler Way, James Street and First Avenue, Hotel Seattle was constructed in 1890. It replaced the Occidental Hotel which burned down in the fire of 1889. In 1891, the building served as home to the Seattle Public Library. Around the time of the construction of the nearby Smith Tower in 1914, Hotel Seattle was converted from hotel use to an office building. By 1961, the building was abandoned and later torn down and replaced with a parking garage. This instigated a historic preservation movement in the Pioneer Square area to preserve other historic buildings before they could be demolished.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00821

    Date: 1903

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  • Seattle-Tacoma Airport, ca. 1950

    Seattle-Tacoma Airport, ca. 1950

    Transcribed from postcard: "The new $11,000,000 Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, now serving the United States, Alaska and the Orient."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00407

    Date: 1950?

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  • University National Bank of Seattle, ca. 1915

    University National Bank of Seattle, ca. 1915

    Transcribed from postcard: "University National Bank of Seattle Financial Headquarters from Seattle's Great North End." The building was constructed in 1912.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00200

    Date: 1915?

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  • Young Women's Christian Association at 5th Ave. and Seneca St.

    Young Women's Christian Association at 5th Ave. and Seneca St.

    Nowell, Frank H., 1864-1950

    Opened in 1914 and led by Mrs. Rees Daniels, the YWCA headquarters was a support center for young working women. The eight-story brick building still serves as the YWCA headquarters today.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00500

    Date: 1915?

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  • Elk's Hall at 4th Ave. and Spring St., ca. 1912

    Elk's Hall at 4th Ave. and Spring St., ca. 1912

    Street view of Elk's Hall on Fourth Ave. and Spring Street.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00503

    Date: 1912?

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  • Moscow Restaurant, February 1952

    Moscow Restaurant, February 1952

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Seattle; Wash. Russian Restaurant; Lakeview Blvd.

    Identifier: spl_wl_res_00155

    Date: 1952-02

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  • Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, ca. 1950

    Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, ca. 1950

    Transcribed from postcard: "Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, Seattle, Washington, in down-town Seattle. From the observation platform in Smith Tower, a 42-story building, one may enjoy an excellent view of the city and surrounding country."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00210

    Date: 1950?

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  • Olympic Hotel, ca. 1930

    Olympic Hotel, ca. 1930

    The Fairmont Olympic Hotel, originally the Olympic Hotel, was built in 1924. The hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00809

    Date: 1930?

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  • King Street Station, ca. 1911

    King Street Station, ca. 1911

    During the early 1900s, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was constructed in 1911. (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) Confusingly, both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01013

    Date: 1911

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