• King Street Station, ca. 1909

    King Street Station, ca. 1909

    During the early 1900s, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was constructed in 1911. (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) Confusingly, both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01004

    Date: 1909?

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  • St. James Cathedral, November 15, 1909

    St. James Cathedral, November 15, 1909

    Bishop Edward O'Dea purchased the land for St. James Cathedral's First Hill site in 1903 after successfully petitioning the Pope to relocate the episcopal see from Vancouver, Washington to Seattle. The cornerstone for the building was laid in 1905 with more than 5,000 people in attendance and the cathedral officially opened on December 15, 1907.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00307

    Date: 1909-11-15

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  • Hotel Lincoln's rooftop garden, ca. 1910

    Hotel Lincoln's rooftop garden, ca. 1910

    Hotel Lincoln was constructed in 1900 at the intersection of 4th Avenue and Madison Street. The hotel was destroyed by fire in 1920.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00803

    Date: 1910?

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  • Alaska Building, ca. 1910

    Alaska Building, ca. 1910

    The Alaska Building, constructed between 1903 and 1904, was the first building in Seattle to be built with a steel frame. At 14 stories high, it was the tallest building in Seattle until the construction of the Hoge Building in 1911.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00206

    Date: 1910?

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  • Colman Building, ca. 1907

    Colman Building, ca. 1907

    The Colman Building, located at 811 1st Ave., was constructed by James M. Colman (1832-1906) in 1889 and expanded in 1906. Colman was a leading figure in the development of Seattle who was also responsible for the construction of the Colman dock along the waterfront. In 1972, the Colman Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. It also received landmark status from the City of Seattle in 1990.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00209

    Date: 1907?

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  • Frye Hotel, December 5, 1917

    Frye Hotel, December 5, 1917

    Transcribed from postcard: "When in Seattle, Try the Frye, Hotel Frye, Opposite 42 story L.C. Smith Bldg." The Frye Hotel (also known as Hotel Frye) was constructed in 1911 and designed by the architects Charles H. Bebb and Louis L. Mendel. The project was funded by Seattle pioneer George F. Frye and his wife Louisa Frye (originally of the Denny family). The hotel was converted to low income housing in the 1970s.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00812

    Date: 1917-12-05

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  • King Street Station, ca. 1906

    King Street Station, ca. 1906

    Transcribed from postcard: "The Union Station accommodates more than sixty trains daily, running over rails of eight great railway systems. The tower is 240 feet high." During the early 1900's, there was an increasing press to connect railways with the city of Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was not constructed until 1911. The postcard captioning can be confusing because both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. The back of the postcard provides the following description: "The Union Station accommodates more than sixty trains daily, running over the rails of eight great railway systems. The tower is 240 feet high." (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01001

    Date: 1906?

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  • Olympic Hotel, ca. 1925

    Olympic Hotel, ca. 1925

    The Fairmont Olympic Hotel, originally the Olympic Hotel, was built in 1924 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00814

    Date: 1925?

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  • Smith Tower, ca. 1915

    Smith Tower, ca. 1915

    Nowell, Frank H., 1864-1950

    Transcribed from postcard: "Second Ave and the 42 Story L.C. Smith Bldg. Seattle. U.S.A. Eight elevators-two serving the tower. Six hundred Offices. Six stores. Telegraph office on first Floor. Barber Shop, Restaurant, Buffet in Basement, Thirty-fifth Floor furnished in Washington."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00217

    Date: 1915?

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