• Midnights

    Midnights

    Swift, Taylor

    Taylor Swift's new studio album is available everywhere on October 21. It's a collection of music written in the middle of the night, a journey through terrors and sweet dreams. The floors we pace and the demons we face, the stories of 13 sleepless nights scattered throughout Taylor Swift's life. (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Midnights
  • Foreverandevernomore

    Foreverandevernomore

    Eno, Brian

    FOREVERANDEVERNOMORE is Brian Eno's first solo album of vocal-based songs since 2005's Another Day on Earth (although he did sing on 2016's The Ship, which included a Velvet Underground cover). Featuring regular collaborators such as Roger Eno (who plays accordion on a couple of songs), guitarist Leo Abrahams, and electronic musician Jon Hopkins, the record is mainly sung by Brian, with a few songs featuring other vocalists, including his daughter, Darla Eno. Far from the moody, atmospheric pieces of Another Day on Earth or the more uptempo, gospel-inspired songs from Eno's 2008 collaboration with David Byrne, FOREVERANDEVERNOMORE consists of slow, spacious meditations with environmentally conscious lyrics. As Eno explained before the release of the album, he's expressing his feelings rather than writing protest music or telling his listeners what to do or how to get involved. He wonders if people will keep up unprofitable scientific research during opener "Who Gives a Thought," which nearly sounds like an ambient Underworld track. "We Let It In" is backed by breathing exercises and Darla's chanting of the word "sun." "Garden of Stars" seems to warn against environmental and societal collapse, with the ominous words "these billion years will end" accompanied by tense vibrations and dive-bombing explosions. The mournful "There Were Bells" is surprisingly close to Dead Can Dance-style ethereal darkwave, as birdsong leads into a dramatic elegy for "those who had to stay." While most of the songs are relatively brief, final piece "Making Gardens Out of Silence in the Uncanny Valley" lasts for over 13 minutes, with Kyoko Inatome's time-stretched vocals slowly disintegrating over glacially paced drone waves and more bird sounds. One of Eno's most sobering releases, FOREVERANDEVERNOMORE is a cautious reflection on the state of our planet and its future. ~ Paul Simpson (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Foreverandevernomore
  • Cool It Down

    Cool It Down

    Yeah Yeah Yeahs (Musical group)

    Yeah Yeah Yeahs only make music when they have something to say. Nearly a decade separated Cool It Down and Mosquito, during which time Karen O made two solo albums including 2019's Lux Prima. She and Brian Chase and Nick Zinner were so established in their individual work (Chase remained a fixture on the experimental jazz scene; Zinner toured with, recorded, and produced artists ranging from the Rentals to Amen Dunes to Phoebe Bridgers) that a reunion seemed uncertain. Luckily for fans, they did get back together, and their fifth album once again switches gears from the one before it. Cool It Down owes less to Mosquito's rock revivalism than it does to Lux Prima's lush sonics and, maybe more importantly, its viewpoint. The light touch and generosity of spirit within O's songwriting made itself known as early as Fever to Tell's "Maps," but she refined it with her solo work and reintroduces it to the band with transporting results, balancing the experience of age and the wonder of youth in songs that teeter between reflection and elation. The band bookends Cool It Down with songs about children's perspectives. O has always written tenderly about and for children, and "Spitting Off the Edge of the World," a radiant yet heartbroken meditation on the ecologically broken world left to the next generation featuring Perfume Genius, and "Mars," inspired by a sweetly imaginative moment with her son, are no exception. By contrast, the gorgeous, big-hearted pop of "Different Today" possesses the wisdom to acknowledge the past, accept the present, and look forward to the future even as the world "goes spinnin' out of control." Over the years, O has also become a more accomplished and varied vocalist, and she brings more colors to her Cool It Down performances than on Yeah Yeah Yeahs' previous albums or even Lux Prima. "Burning" is a driving showcase for all her skills; as the song builds into a soulful inferno, her wails and whispers are forces of nature, and her comparisons to meteors and the river Styx are completely apt. "Fleez," the record's brightly funky midpoint, pairs spoken-word verses that hark back to the early gem "Art Star" with a groove that's tautly danceable even if the band doesn't break a sweat. Songs such as this and "Wolf," a piece of shimmering electro-pop seduction where squiggly synths echo O's vibrato, borrow some of It's Blitz!'s chrome-plated sleekness and commanding beats and showcase Dave Sitek's production. Sitek often felt like Yeah Yeah Yeahs' unofficial fourth member, and his chemistry with them remains strong on tracks like the lushly layered "Blacktop." For a band who seemed so impulsive at the outset, Yeah Yeah Yeahs' reflection and deliberation has been a surprising strength that's only grown with time. They may never lose all their restlessness -- nor should they -- but it's undeniable that Cool It Down is one of their most consistent albums. ~ Heather Phares (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Cool It Down
  • Only the Strong Survive: Covers. Vol. 1

    Only the Strong Survive: Covers. Vol. 1

    Springsteen, Bruce

    A collection of soul music gems that celebrate the legendary songbooks of Gamble and Huff, Motown, Stax, and many more. Features vocals from Springsteen and instrumentation primarily from his longtime producer Ron Aniello. The album also features guest vocals from Sam Moore. (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Only the Strong Survive: Covers. Vol. 1
  • World Record

    World Record

    Young, Neil

    Features ten songs, nine written during the last year about the events and condition of our world. (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View World Record
  • Every Loser

    Every Loser

    Pop, Iggy

    Iggy Pop was 75 years old when he released Every Loser in January 2023, and anyone who ever heard Metallic KO, the shambolic semi-bootleg document of Iggy and the Stooges collapsing during a disastrous final concert in 1974, has to marvel at that fact. There have been any number of reasons to call game over on Pop and his musical career in the past half-century, and that he's both ambulatory and productive is a welcome surprise. What's all the more remarkable is Every Loser happens to be a very good rock & roll album. Plenty of musicians would age out of playing music as aggressive as Pop's on Every Loser, and even more to the point, on albums like 2009's Preliminaires, 2012's Après, and 2019's Free, Pop seemed to have burned out on the very idea of rock & roll, aiming for more subtle and contemplative sounds in his golden years. For whatever reason, when producer Andrew Watt approached Pop about making an album, he decided he was game, and Every Loser is big, loud, and brimming with piss and vinegar. Its cranky and opinionated soul suggests 2001's Beat Em Up, the nadir that came before the Stooges reunion gave Pop a second wind, though Every Loser succeeds where that album failed. Part of the credit goes to Watt, who has brought together some worthy talent to back up his star, including Duff McKagan of Guns 'N Roses, Chad Smith and Josh Klinghoffer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Stone Gossard of Pearl Jam, and Taylor Hawkins of the Foo Fighters in one of his final recorded performances. Watt hasn't used his supporting cast for star power, but to give the music a combination of muscle and finesse, and that's just what he gets -- this music can leave a bruise when it needs to on tracks like "Frenzy" and "Modern Day Rip Off," but can also generate a dark and potent groove on more measured numbers like "Strung Out Johnny" and "Morning Show," and they've helped him craft some viable melodies that are simple but not dumb. The greater credit, of course, goes to Pop himself. Every Loser may be full of cranky musings, but they're smart cranky musings, and along with the tirades against 21st century culture, there are some insightful musings about addiction, the joys and terrors of life in Miami, and the surprising pleasures of still being alive. Pop sings with passion, force, and genuine authority, sometimes suggesting his age but sounding far more limber than he should. At 75, Iggy Pop is happy to be smart, pissed off, capable of writing good songs about it all, and singing with a crack rock band behind him. There's a heady joy in his bile that's infectious, and Every Loser is a weirdly joyous celebration of life from someone who knows why you shouldn't toss it aside. ~ Mark Deming (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Every Loser
  • Strays

    Strays

    Price, Margo

    Margo Price begins Strays by declaring that she's been to the mountain and back, a proclamation she pairs with a stylized, amorous throb that's equal parts new wave and classic rock. That statement and that sound make it clear that Strays finds Price continuing to wander far afield from the traditional country of her 2016 debut Midwest Farmer's Daughter, developing a distinctive synthesis of a variety of styles that can't quite be pegged as Americana. Sharp, incisive songwriting remains at the heart of her music, allowing Price to weave different sounds and rhythms into her probing, emotionally open songs. Certain lines strike the air as possibly autobiographical but she's kept the confessions to her memoir, Maybe We'll Make It. Here, she's telling stories, slightly emphasizing atmosphere over individual tracks. Which isn't to say that the songs on Strays blend together: they're distinct creatures that are interconnected. After launching the album's journey with "Been to the Mountain," she slides into the road-weathered "Light Me Up" with the assistance of Heartbreaker Mike Campbell whose solos help give the song some grit. Sharon Van Etten takes an opposite tactic on the subsequent "Radio," allowing Price to accentuate hooks that would've been radio-ready in the glory days of AOR. Price often circles this classicist sound, modernizing the retro vibe with precise, shimmering production along with a subtle reliance on groove; the album flows so well because it has a palpable, soulful pulse. Everything changes with "Lydia" and "Landfill," a pair of searching, nocturnal, neo-folk songs that serves as a kind of epilogue at the end of the album, concluding Strays on a somewhat uneasy note that is ultimately a sign of Price's confidence: Sometimes a melancholy finale suits a good time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Strays
  • And in the Darkness, Hearts Aglow

    And in the Darkness, Hearts Aglow

    Weyes Blood

    Technological agitation. Narcissism fatigue. A galaxy of isolation. These are the new norms keeping Weyes Blood (aka Natalie Mering) up at night and the themes at the heart of her latest release. (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View And in the Darkness, Hearts Aglow
  • Revolver

    Revolver

    Beatles

    From "Taxman" to "Tomorrow Never Knows," this Beatles album has been newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and Sam Okell, and sourced directly from the original four-track master tapes with audio brought forth in stunning clarity with the help of cutting-edge technology developed by the award-winning sound team at Peter Jackson's WingNut Films Productions Ltd. (syndetics)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View Revolver
  • \

    \

    Daft Punk (Musical group)

    Daft Punk's full-length debut is a funk-house hailstorm, giving real form to a style of straight-ahead dance music not attempted since the early fusion days of on-the-one funk and dance-party disco. Thick, rumbling bass, vocoders, choppy breaks and beats, and a certain brash naiveté permeate the record from start to finish, giving it the edge of an almost certain classic. While a few fall flat, the best tracks make this one essential. ~ Sean Cooper (syndetics) (2/6/2023 1:19:56 AM)

    Format: Music CD

    Availability: All copies in use

    View \