• Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee

    Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee

    Cep, Casey N.

    "The stunning true story of an Alabama serial killer, and the trial that obsessed the author of To Kill a Mockingbird in the years after the publication of her classic novel--a complicated and difficult time in her life that, until now, has been very little examined. Willie Maxwell was a Baptist reverend in Alabama; he also happened to be a serial killer. Between 1970 and 1977, his two wives and brother all died under suspicious circumstances -- each with hefty life insurance policies taken out by none other than the Reverend himself. With the help of a savvy lawyer, Maxwell escaped justice for years. Then, the teenage daughter of his third wife perished. At the funeral, the victim's uncle shot the Reverend dead in a church full of witnesses--and was subsequently acquitted of the murder, thanks to the same savvy lawyer who had represented the Reverend for all those years. Sitting in the audience during the trial was Harper Lee, who had traveled from New York to her native Alabama with an idea of writing a book about the case. Now, Casey Cep brings this nearly inconceivable, gripping story to life on the page: from the shocking murders to the chicanery of insurance fraud to the courtroom drama. At the same time, it is a vividly told, elegiac account of Harper Lee's quest to write a second book after To Kill a Mockingbird, and a deeply moving portrait of this beloved writer's struggle with fame, success, and the mysteries of artistic creativity"--

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 16 on 50 copies

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  • Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest

    Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest

    Willis-Abdurraqib, Hanif

    How does one pay homage to A Tribe Called Quest? The seminal rap group brought jazz into the genre, resurrecting timeless rhythms to create masterpieces such as The Low End Theory and Midnight Marauders. Seventeen years after their last album, they resurrected themselves with an intense, socially conscious record, We Got It from Here--Thank You 4 Your Service, which arrived when fans needed it most, in the aftermath of the 2016 election. Poet and essayist Hanif Abdurraqib digs into the group's history and draws from his own experience to reflect on how its distinctive sound resonated among fans like himself. The result is as ambitious and genre bending as the rap group itself. Abdurraqib traces the Tribe's creative career, from their early days as part of the Afrocentric rap collective known as the Native Tongues, through their first three classic albums, to their eventual breakup and long hiatus. Their work is placed in the context of the broader rap landscape of the 1990s, one upended by sampling laws that forced a reinvention in production methods, the East Coast/West Coast rivalry that threatened to destroy the genre, and some record labels' shift from focusing on groups to individual MCs. Throughout the narrative Abdurraqib connects the music and cultural history to their street-level impact. Whether he's remembering The Source magazine cover announcing the Tribe's 1998 breakup or writing personal letters to the group after bandmate Phife Dawg's death, Abdurraqib seeks the deeper truths of A Tribe Called Quest; truths that, like the low end, the bass, are not simply heard in the head, but felt in the chest.

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 26 on 7 copies

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  • Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion

    Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion

    Tolentino, Jia

    A breakout writer at The New Yorker examines the fractures at the center of contemporary culture with verve, deftness, and intellectual ferocity--for readers who've wondered what Susan Sontag would have been like if she had brain damage from the internet.

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 403 on 286 copies

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  • Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style

    Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style

    Dreyer, Benjamin

    "Authoritative as it is amusing, this book distills everything Benjamin Dreyer has learned from the hundreds of books he has copyedited, including works by Elizabeth Strout, E. L. Doctorow, and Frank Rich, into a useful guide not just for writers but for everyone who wants to put their best foot forward in writing prose. Dreyer offers lessons on the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar, including how to navigate the words he calls 'the confusables,' like tricky homophones; the myriad ways to use (and misuse) a comma; and how to recognize--though not necessarily do away with--the passive voice. (Hint: If you can plausibly add 'by zombies' to the end of a sentence, it's passive.) People are sharing their writing more than ever--on blogs, on Twitter--and this book lays out, clearly and comprehensibly, everything writers can do to keep readers focused on the real reason writers write: to communicate their ideas clearly and effectively. Chock-full of advice, insider wisdom, and fun facts on the rules (and nonrules) of the English language, this book will prove invaluable to everyone who wants to shore up their writing skills, mandatory for people who spend their time editing and shaping other people's prose, and--perhaps best of all--an utter treat for anyone who simply revels in language"--

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 10 on 34 copies

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  • Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone

    Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone

    Taylor, Astra

    "What is democracy, really? What do we mean when we use the term? And can it ever truly exist? Astra Taylor, hailed as a 'New Civil Rights Leader' by the Los Angeles Times, provides surprising answers. There is no shortage of democracy, at least in name, yet it is in crisis everywhere we look. From a cabal of plutocrats in the White House to gerrymandering and dark-money campaign contributions, it is clear that the principle of government by and for the people is not living up to its promise. The problems lie deeper than any one election cycle. As Astra Taylor demonstrates, real democracy--fully inclusive and completely egalitarian--has in fact never existed. In a tone that is both philosophical and anecdotal, weaving together history, theory, the stories of individuals, and interviews with former prime ministers and such leading thinkers as Cornel West and Wendy Brown, Taylor invites us to reexamine the term. Is democracy a means or an end, a process or a set of desired outcomes? What if those outcomes, whatever they may be--peace, prosperity, equality, liberty, an engaged citizenry--can be achieved by nondemocratic means? In what areas of life should democratic principles apply? If democracy means rule by the people, what does it mean to rule and who counts as the people? Democracy's inherent paradoxes often go unnamed and unrecognized. Exploring such questions, [this book] offers a better understanding of what is possible, why democracy is so hard to realize, and why it remains worth striving for."--Dust jacket.

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 14 on 6 copies

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  • An American Sunrise: Poems

    An American Sunrise: Poems

    Harjo, Joy

    A stunning new volume from the first Native American Poet Laureate of the United States, informed by her tribal history and connection to the land.

    Format: Book - 2019 First edition

    Holds: 4 on 94 copies

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  • Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America

    Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America

    Austin, Nefertiti

    "In America, Mother = White. That's what Nefertiti, a single African American woman, discovered when she decided she wanted to adopt a Black baby boy out of the foster care system. Eager to finally join the motherhood ranks, Nefertiti was shocked when people started asking her why she wanted to adopt a 'crack baby' or said that she would never be able to raise a Black son on her own. She realized that American society saw motherhood through a white lens, and that there would be no easy understanding or acceptance of the kind of family she hoped to build. Motherhood So White is the story of Nefertiti's fight to create the family she always knew she was meant to have and the story of motherhood that all American families need now. In this unflinching account of her parenting journey, Nefertiti examines the history of adoption in the African American community, faces off against stereotypes of single, Black motherhood, and confronts the reality of raising children of color in racially charged, modern-day America. Honest, vulnerable, and uplifting, Motherhood So White reveals what Nefertiti knew all along - that the only requirement for a successful family is one raised with love." --

    Format: Book - 2019

    Holds: 3 on 8 copies

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  • How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy

    How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy

    Odell, Jenny

    "When the technologies we use every day collapse our experiences into 24/7 availability, platforms for personal branding, and products to be monetized, nothing can be quite so radical as doing nothing. Here, Jenny Odell sends up a flare from the heart of Silicon Valley, delivering an action plan to resist capitalist narratives of productivity and techno-determinism, and to become more meaningfully connected in the process"--

    Format: Book - 2019

    Holds: 447 on 74 copies

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  • Every Tool's A Hammer: Life Is What You Make It

    Every Tool's A Hammer: Life Is What You Make It

    Savage, Adam

    "Every Tool's a Hammer is a chronicle of my life as a maker. It's an exploration of making and of my own productive obsessions, but it's also a permission slip of sorts from me to you. Permission to grab hold of the things you're interested in, that fascinate you, and to dive deeper into them to see where they lead you. Through stories from forty-plus years of making and molding, building and breaku01afing, along with the lessons I learned along the way, this book is meant to be a toolbox of problem solving, complete with a shop's worth of notes on the tools, techniques, and materials that I use most often. Things like: In Every Tool There Is a Hammer -- don't wait until everything is perfect to begin a project, and if you don't have the exact right tool for a task, just use whatever's handy; Increase Your Loose Tolerance -- making is messy and filled with screwups, but that's okay, as creativity is a path with twists and turns and not a straight line to be found; Use More Cooling Fluid -- it prolongs the life of blades and bits, and it prevents tool failure, but beyond that it's a reminder to slow down and reduce the fricu01aftion in your work and relationships; Screw Before You Glue -- mechanical fasteners allow you to change and modify a project while glue is forever but sometimes you just need the right glue, so I dig into which ones will do the job with the least harm and best effects. This toolbox also includes lessons from many other incredible makers and creators, including: Jamie Hyneman, Nick Offerman, Pixar director Andrew Stanton, Oscar-winner Guillermo del Toro, artist Tom Sachs, and chef Traci Des Jardins. And if everything goes well, we will hopefully save you a few mistakes (and maybe fingers) as well as help you turn your curiosities into creations. I hope this book inspires you to build, make, invent, explore, and -- most of all -- enjoy the thrills of being a creator." --

    Format: Book - 2019 First Atria Books hardcover edition

    Holds: 6 on 8 copies

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  • They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South

    They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South

    Jones-Rogers, Stephanie E.

    "Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America"-- (1/19/2020 11:58:56 AM)

    Format: Book - 2019

    Holds: 1 on 8 copies

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